Healthcare & Social Services

​Healthcare and social service providers face deep challenges, struggling to meet expanding needs against a backdrop of shrinking resources and high rates of burn-out. From doctors to social workers to hospice staff, civic reflection offers medical and social service providers the opportunity to think about the meaning of their work in new ways, explore fundamental questions about service, commitment, and leadership, and reassess their approach to patient and client care.

CIVIC REFLECTION IN HEALTHCARE & SOCIAL SERVICES
CIVIC REFLECTION IN HEALTHCARE & SOCIAL SERVICES

Benefits:

  • Increased capacity to work effectively with colleagues and the people they serve

  • Improved approach to patient and client care

  • Increased job satisfaction -- with 70% of participants saying that civic reflection improved their work experience and increased their commitment to their work

View impact case studies that detail CCR's work with hospitals, hospice centers and healthcare and social service groups.

What People Are Saying

"

I feel like I’m on the receiving end of care in the reflective reading [program]. That it’s time for me. That I’m not functioning as a chaplain in that time, that I’m functioning as a human being who needs support and needs time to reflect on my work. And needs time to hear what other people have to say and take that in and see how my perspective might be changed... how I might be strengthened to keep doing what I’m doing.

"

--Chaplain, Hospice

"

The opportunity to participate in reflective reading within our palliative care program has provided an amazing opportunity for our clinicians to briefly step outside their day-to-day each month and reflect on the tremendous impact of their work. Our staff have reported this experience has led to greater job satisfaction and they have requested that it continue beyond the pilot phase into the next year.

"

--Brian Berger, Director of Counseling Services

Midwest Palliative & Hospice CareCenter

"

Reflective Reading serves as a reminder to be flexible and open… one opening exercise we used was ‘Describe a ritual for yourself.’ Mine was trying to remember to hold the door open when transport is bringing in a patient—and not just to rush through. I’ve started doing that… the ritual is about being present.

"

--Physician

Stroger Hospital