Unitarian Church of Evanston Discussion Series

The Unitarian Church of Evanston believes that personal experience, conscience, and reason should be the final authorities in religion. In the end religious authority lies not in a book, person, or institution, but in ourselves.

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This process of civic reflection provides a meaningful structure for our Unitarian Universalist covenant group to have deeper conversations with each other about our UU principles and how we live our principles in the world. Through the readings and discussion, I feel more connected to the others in the group and grateful to learn and grow from each person's perspective.

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--Discussion Participant

Unitarian Church of Evanston

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Our civic life is shaped by so many parts of our life, including our spiritual perspective. Civic reflection has been transformative to my spiritual growth as I learn to listen to and respect others and as we work toward making this a just and whole world.

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--Discussion Participant

Unitarian Church of Evanston

Audience Focus

Members of one covenant group at the Unitarian Church of Evanston

Goals

  1. Strengthen the sense of community and connection within the covenant group
  2. Provide a space that allows church members to clarify their own values and beliefs
  3. Increase commitment to exploring Unitarian Universalist principles and living them out in the world
  4. Deepen understanding of moral and ethical dilemmas -- and willingness to discuss these dilemmas with others
Inside of Unitarian Church Evanston

Project Description

A 6-12 member covenant group from the Unitarian Church of Evanston gathered once or twice a month to hold civic reflection discussions about questions relating to the seven Unitarian Universalist principles. The principles they explored included the inherent worth and dignity of every person, the right of conscience and the use of the democratic process within congregations and society at large, and justice, equity and compassion in human relations. Each member of the covenant group facilitated one of the sessions, using CCR's resource, The Civically Engaged Reader.

Impact

  1. Participants developed stronger connections to others in the group and were able to learn and grow from each other's perspectives.
  2. Participants were able to gain a better understanding of their individual and collective spiritual perspectives and beliefs.
  3. Participants felt that they had a deeper understanding of issues relevant to faith communities today -- and a deeper commitment to delving into these issues with others.
  4. Participants reported increased clarity about the Unitarian Universalist principles and how to put these principles into action
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