May 2012 Open-Call Facilitation Training

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CCR has one of the best causes I have come across on an organizational level. Continue to inspire civic reflection for all people of all professional backgrounds!

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--May 2012 Open-Call Training Participant

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I did not know what to expect coming into this workshop. I felt overwhelmed at first, but I now leave feeling inspired, invigorated, and excited to lead a civic reflection and to serve others. I was challenged in a way that made me think about myself and the impact I can have and my thoughts/actions have on the world.

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--May 2012 Open-Call Training Participant

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This workshop was very well-planned. After only two days, I walk away with full confidence that civic reflection is empowering and that I am a capable facilitator.

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--May 2012 Open-Call Training Participant

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Before civic reflection, I was a ball of anxiety… I felt weird in social situations and felt a degree of despair because I thought I’d never get the chance to really share experiences with groups of people and got to a point where I almost believed my thoughts & feelings did not matter. So, really, this workshop & all sessions we have had with civic reflection made me realize my own potential with communication.

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--May 2012 Open-Call Training Participant

Audience Focus

23 participants, ranging from AmeriCorps members to non-profit staff to higher education professionals to educators from a wide variety of personal and professional backgrounds.

Goals

  1. Help participants gain facilitation skills and better understand the practice of civic reflection in a hands-on, interactive way
  2. Give participants a memorable two-day experience that allows them to build skills and relationships with each other
  3. Support participants in thinking about and planning ways to build reflection and dialogue into their communities or places of work in the future
Participants engage in discussion at May 2012 Training

Project Description

The purpose of the Open-Call Civic Reflection Facilitation Training on May 10-11, 2012 was to help develop facilitation skills and understanding among people who want to incorporate reflection and dialogue into their community groups, civic organizations, educational institutions, and other places of community, work, and civic life. Over the course of the two-day workshop, the 23 participants were introduced to the practice of civic reflection and had the chance to participate in several large and small group reflective discussions that modeled the discussions they might lead in their own communities or places of work. Finally, each participant had the opportunity to plan and lead a discussion of his/her own with one or two other facilitators-in-training. This workshop was designed not only to help participants feel better-equipped to lead civic reflection discussions in their own communities and places of work, but to give participants a space to reflect and build community away from the chaos of their day-to-day lives. In this way, the participants’ experience reflects the value of civic reflection as a whole and helps them to better understand the importance of taking time to think deeply about who we are and why we do what we do.

Impact

  1. 100% of participants said the training increased their desire to lead a civic reflection discussion in their own organizations.
  2. Over 95% of participants agreed or strongly agreed that the training helped enhance their active listening skills.
  3. Over 75% of participants said that the workshop deepened their skills as a facilitator “to a great extent.”
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