Civic Reflection for Educators Facilitation Training

"

Terrific. It was clarifying in so many ways. I’m relieved to know there are techniques, methods, a format, a resource library, and a wonderful staff to help me carry out [discussions] successfully in the future.

"

--Training Participant, Civic Reflection for Educators Workshop

"

This was a great workshop—I am sad for it to end! I’m really taking back some new ideas for my classroom and staff on using names, planning discussions, using openings and closings, etc.

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--Training Participant, Civic Reflection for Educators Workshop

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 Learning by doing is always a preferred path for me. Thank you!

"

--Training Participant, Civic Reflection for Educators Workshop

Audience Focus

24 teachers, educators, and members of service/education organizations

Goals

  1. Deepen participants’ understanding of civic reflection
  2. Develop participants’ facilitation skills
  3. Prepare participants to organize, lead, and troubleshoot reflective discussions with their own colleagues, students and community groups
  4. Foster a community of facilitators in which participants can call upon each other for guidance and support
CCR Director, Adam Davis, leads training with participants around him

Project Description

As part of the Teachers’ Inquiry Project, the Center for Civic Reflection hosted an open-call Civic Reflection Facilitation Training for Educators in August 2012. The two-day training familiarized participants with the practice of civic reflection and prepared them to lead reflective dialogues at their own schools and organizations. Individuals were given the opportunity to participate in large and small group reflective discussions, as well as plan and lead their own discussions, gaining valuable hands-on experience.

On the first day, the workshop began with a large group discussion using Julia Kasdorf’s poem, “What I Learned from my Mother” and the image, “Kindergarten Project.” The remainder of the day was spent training individuals to lead and plan discussions of their own in small groups. Then, participants broke into small discussion groups that were led by pairs of participant facilitators on Touré’s article, “Preconceptions” and an image, “Students of Mixed Race Sitting Together."

The second day of the workshop included two more participant-led discussions and trainings led by CCR staff on selecting resources for discussion, making the case for civic reflection at schools and organizations, troubleshooting difficult scenarios while facilitating, and implementing the practice of reflective dialogue into participants’ workplaces.

Impact

  1. 100% of participants agreed that the workshop developed their skills as a facilitator, with 88% agreeing to a “great extent.”
  2. 94% of participants “strongly agreed” that the workshop helped increase their desire to lead reflective discussions in their own schools and organizations.
  3. 100% of participants agreed that the workshop helped increase their confidence to lead a civic reflection discussion, with 76% strongly agreeing.
  4. 88% of participants agreed that the workshop helped them to communicate and/or articulate their own beliefs and values.
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